Design Challenge - November 2014

Lumede/Oliver Becker

Lumede/Oliver BeckerThe basic idea for our design was the need to improve the structural and ergonomic performance of snow groomers in alpine or similar mountains, in traditional applications such as preparing the slopes, transport of goods to remote places and search-and-rescue operations. We did not interfere with the powerplant, retaining the usual diesel engine and hydraulics, but instead concentrated on finding new ideas for structural and ergonomic improvements.
Firstly, to improve the traction and grip, we made the two banks of tracks able to tilt on their longitudinal axis, so as to keep more of the tracks in ground contact on uneven terrain.

The winch, which is usually mounted on the rear transport platform, has been divided into two components. The cable drum and the motor are located beneath the cabin, putting their weight closer to the ground. The winch arm is mounted on a circular structure on top of the cabin and can rotate freely through 360° without the risk of the cable harming the structure or personnel. Our groomer is also equipped as standard with an additional mini groomer, which is capable of reaching sites in extreme terrain, where the large machine cannot go. Its main purpose is for the rescue of injured persons.

Several ergonomic improvements have helped to enhance visibility. To provide a better view, we made the cabin circular, with windows all around. We also created a rooftop window, as in mountainous areas it can be important to have a good view overhead.

The cabin has three 60° rotating doors to provide easy access to the left, right and rear (the carrier platform). Sliding doors have the advantage that – even with strong winds – they cannot slam or move involuntarily.
Better night-time visibility is guaranteed by the circle of spotlights clustered around the top rim of the cabin – these can be activated together, or one section at a time, from the cabin.

The cabin is large enough to contain three seats in the front, while in the back it has space for two stretchers. The back door is used to admit the stretchers, which are stored on a post at the rear of the cabin. In the event of a rescue, they can be lifted by the rooftop winch.

The driver’s seat is positioned further forward than those to the left and right, so as to provide the best view. Furthermore, it can be tilted by up to 20° to either side to improve comfort and security while working on slopes. All instruments use a head-up display in front of the driver, which inclines together with the seat. The seating cushions are made from a number of single elements, to allow damp clothing to breathe and dry.

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BIOGRAPHY


Lumede/Oliver Becker

Lutz Meyer and Oliver Becker graduated in industrial design from the Muthesius Kunsthochschule in Kiel, Germany. They have worked on several projects for Atlas Weyhausen

 


CONTACT DETAILS

Email: www.lumede.de

Web: www.oliverbecker.biz

 

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