Design Challenge - March 2013

Lumede/Oliver Becker

Lumede/Oliver Becker DesignTHE CLGC 95 TOOL-CARRIER APPROACH


Our study shows an all-in-one combination of three construction vehicles commonly used for roadbuilding. The idea for the CLGC 95 (compact loader-grader-compactor) concept came from the fact that loaders and compactors are very similar in construction so we began thinking about which other interchangeable front tool units could be used with the same rear motor/cabin unit.


The CLGC 95 is dimensioned like a compact wheeled loader, because in this size, each combination would be just as efficient as each purpose-built machine. The advantage of this combination comes into play mostly in small roadbuilding applications and for the construction of farming and forestry roads, where a single machine could handle all the work. So instead of having one loader, one grader and one compactor, this combination reduces investment in machines as well as operators.


The front units are attached by means of a hydraulic attachment bracket, positioned in front of the lockable articulated pendulum joint. When one tool unit is detached, the rear unit can move with the assistance of a movable stabiliser wheel underneath the cabin, which is retracted once the units are connected. To connect the rear unit to a front unit, there is a quick connection underneath the cabin, consisting of a pyramid-shaped (without a top) part on the rear unit and a housing for this shape in the front unit. This conical shape serves to centre the parts. Two steel bars are located within the housing, onto which two hydraulic-powered clamps in the rear part lock to form the connection. As well as this mechanical connection, there is a hydraulic connector, and an electronic connection, which gives information to the onboard computer about which tool is connected. All in all, the changing from one tool to another should not take more than one hour.


Between the wheel hub and the outer rim are carbon-fibre spokes that provide flexibility and shock absorption to the wheel. On each rim are mounted three interchangeable 120° tyre profile segments filled with an elastic material appropriate for each specific task. The profiles can be changed easily within a short time, as the wheel will stay on the machine.


The motive power is supplied from a fuel cell that charges lithium-ionen accumulators for driving the engine and the hydraulic pump. The power transmission is via electric motors in the wheel hub, while hydraulic power is used to move the air-conditioned cab by about 60cm to either side for a better view of the work.


All operating information will be transferred via head-up display, with the respective control programs activated automatically upon connecting the front unit. The display is not projected onto the front window, but to an inner glass shield to keep the display away from disruptive outer light.



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BIOGRAPHY

Lutz Meyer and Oliver Becker graduated in industrial design from the Muthesius Kunsthochschule in Kiel, Germany. They have worked on several projects for Atlas Weyhausen

CONTACT DETAILS

Web: www.oliverbecker.biz / www.lumede.de

 

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